3-D Model Battlefields

This activity will provide students the opportunity to recreate one of the major battles that took place during the war of 1812.  Based on evidence they have researched, the three-dimensional m odel will allow students to explore the intensity of the war scene, strategies used in battle, and the overall atmosphere/mood of the battle.

Battles of the War of 1812

Creating, Designing and Understanding the War through 3-Dimensional Modeling

Learning outcomes: This activity will provide students the opportunity to recreate one of the major battles that took place during the war of 1812.  Based on evidence they have researched, the three-dimensional m odel will allow students to explore the intensity of the war scene, strategies used in battle, and the overall atmosphere/mood of the battle.

Activity: Working in flexible groupings, students will create a three-dimensional model of one of the major battles during the time of the war. Students will be asked to design a realistic model that will include the presence of key historical figures and display what they believe the battle would have looked like during that time.  Students will also submit a write up along with their battle scene explaining the event as well as the artistic elements they used to accurately create the model.

Suggested battles that can be recreated:

Suggested materials students can use:

  • Wood
  • Popsicle sticks
  • Glue (glue guns and glue sticks)
  • Styrofoam
  • A variety of paints and paint brushes
  • Modeling clay
  • Plastic army figures
  • Construction paper in assorted colours
  • Scissors
  • Tape
  • Pencil crayons/ markers
  • Fabric in assorted colours

Tips for teachers:

  • Students can create their model on a piece of wood or in large shoebox
  • Be sure students include in their write-up an explanation of the artistic elements of design (for example, how they used colour to create the mood and atmosphere of the model)
  • Be sure that students include visible signs or symbols of the battle as it was during that time (for example, they may want to include a British and American Flag, or they may want to have their soldiers dressed or painted in appropriate attire)

Follow-up discussion:

Have students present their models to the class. When presenting, ask the following questions:

1.      How does your model accurately represent the battle you have chosen?

2.      What did you learn about scene of war? What do you notice is happening in your scene?